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Pink, Stinging Eyes?

Conjunctivitis, also called pink eye, is one of the most frequently seen eye diseases, especially in kids. It can be caused by viruses, bacteria or even allergies to pollen, chlorine in swimming pools, and ingredients in cosmetics, or other irritants, which touch the eyes. Some forms of conjunctivitis might be quite transmittable and quickly spread in school and at the office.

Conjunctivitis is seen when the conjunctiva, or thin transparent layer of tissue covering the white part of the eye, becomes inflamed. You can identify conjunctivitis if you notice eye redness, discharge, itching or swollen eyelids and a crusty discharge surrounding the eyes early in the day. Pink eye infections can be divided into three main types: viral, allergic and bacterial conjunctivitis.

The viral type is usually a result of a similar virus to that which produces the recognizable red, watery eyes, sore throat and runny nose of the common cold. The red, itchy, watery eyes caused by viral pink eye are likely to last from a week to two and then will clear up on their own. You may however, be able to reduce some of the discomfort by using soothing drops or compresses. Viral pink eye is transmittable until it is completely cleared up, so in the meantime maintain excellent hygiene, remove eye discharge and try to avoid using communal pillowcases or towels. If your son or daughter has viral conjunctivitis, he or she will have to be kept home from school for three days to a week until symptoms disappear.

A bacterial infection such as Staphylococcus or Streptococcus is usually treated with antibiotic eye drops or cream. One should notice an improvement within just a few days of antibiotic drops, but be sure to adhere to the full prescription dosage to prevent pink eye from recurring.

Allergic pink eye is not contagious. It is usually a result of a known allergy such as hay fever or pet allergies that sets off an allergic reaction in their eyes. First of all, to treat allergic pink eye, you should eliminate the irritant. Use cool compresses and artificial tears to relieve discomfort in mild cases. When the infection is more severe, your eye doctor might prescribe a medication such as an anti-inflammatory or antihistamine. In cases of chronic allergic pink eye, topical steroid eye drops could be used.

Pink eye should always be diagnosed by a qualified eye doctor in order to identify the type and best course of treatment. Never treat yourself! Keep in mind the sooner you begin treatment, the lower chance you have of giving pink eye to loved ones or prolonging your discomfort.

 

Dear valued patient,

We take our commitment to keeping our patients and team safe and healthy inthe midst of this COVID-19 pandemic very seriously. We want to share our plan to comply with social distancing guidelines for your upcoming appointment. Please carefully read the steps below and follow our direction when you arrive. Our team will all be wearing masks and we ask that you bring one with you to wear during your visit (for everyone’s safety, we are requiring staff and patients to wear masks).

We ask patients to complete necessary paperwork online if possible. Click here to access the forms. You may also choose to text a photo of your insurance card and photo ID to the clinic at 763-537-3213.

When you arrive for your appointment, enter the main doors and wait in the front alcove until a staff member greets you. Our front desk team will ask you general health questions to rule out the presence of COVID-19 symptoms.

We are asking that only the patient enter the building for the exam. (Exceptions: Children under 18 may be accompanied by one guardian, and adults with special needs may be accompanied by one caretaker.)

When you enter the building:

Staff will ask you to use hand sanitizer and then you will complete any necessary paperwork that you were not able to complete online, and we will make copies of your insurance card and photo ID if you did not text a picture of them to us.

Prior to seeing your doctor, a technician will escort you to a pre-testing room where you will be asked to wash your hands. We ask that you follow the CDC’s recommendation of washing your hands thoroughly, for a full 20seconds, with soap and water.

Rest assured that every surface and every piece of equipment you come into contact with has been sanitized prior to the arrival of each and every patient entering our practice, and it will be cleaned again as you exit each area.

The team will be frequently washing their hands between interactions as per our usual protocol, and you’ll also see hand sanitizer throughout the practice for your use, as well.

Optical – Shopping for Glasses, Adjustments and Repairs, and Glasses Pick-up

We are scheduling appointments for all optical needs. Please call the clinic at 763-537-3213 to schedule your appointment.

When you are shopping for glasses, one of our ABO certified opticians will ask you to be seated at a station where you will discuss your needs, likes and dislikes. To ensure social distancing, the optician will bring frames to you so you can try them on at the station. The optician will continue to bring frames to you until you find the perfect pair!

We sterilize every frame a patient touches in a UV Cleaning Unit after a shopping appointment so you can be assured any frame you try on has been sanitized prior to your visit.

If you have any questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to call us. We look forward to seeing you!

Thank you for your patience and cooperation,

Your Crystal Vision Clinic Eye Care Team

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We sterilize every frame a patient touches in a UV Cleaning Unit after each shopping appointment so you can be assured any frame you try on has been sanitized prior to your visit.